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Richard Jackson

About Richard Jackson

Richard Jackson moved to Australia from Northern Ireland. He likes it here but detests that parking meters often don't supply change.

Richard Jackson looks at the United States’ alternative to gun control, Michael Jackson’s moonwalk and a very ironic book review. All in Sunday’s Long Reads.

 

 

Inside the race to stop the next mass shooter – Mark Follman (Mother Jones)

In the aftermath of another mass shooting in America, the conversation has turned again to gun control.

Obama is facing political stalemate on the issue and he needs mass support to change it. With gun control laws unlikely to happen, Americans are unfortunately having to turn to alternative methods to prevent mass shootings. They are of course meaningful; if anything helps then it is worth doing. Unfortunately, as the central case study explains, it’s like putting a band-aid on a freshly amputated limb.

 

Inside Michael Jackson’s iconic first moonwalk onstage – Steve Knopper (Rolling Stone)

 The moonwalk. The one act that gains equal amounts of admiration and chagrin from friends and foes alike.

Many people had done the moonwalk before: Cab Galloway, James Brown, even David Bowie. That doesn’t matter. Pop culture remembers Michael Jackson’s Billie Jean.

This article is a behind the scene look at the Michael Jackson’s first walk on the moon, I think it is difficult for people, like myself, who weren’t alive back in 1983 to understand the significance of this cultural moment.

 

Stop sending me Jonathan Franzen novels – Barret Brown (The Intercept)

Barret Brown is an imprisoned U.S. journalist and former member of hacktivist website, Anonymous.

He was arrested in 2012 by the FBI for allegedly making a threat against an federal agent on YouTube, he was later indicted on charges of making an online threat, retaliating against a federal officer and conspiring to release personal information about a government employee.

“Two months later, he was indicated on 12 further charges related to the hacking of private intelligence contractor Stratfor in 2011,” says The Guardian.

 With that in mind, there’s no one better to critique Jonathan Frazen’s new novel Purity, a book that concerns a fictionalised version of Wikileaks lead by an Andreas Wolf, a character modeled on Julian Assange.

We get a withering critique of the modern novel, Franzen and this fictionalised take on Wikileaks.

 

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