Denise Shrivell

The week in Media: 16th September 2016

Media
Image: Adweek/Taylor Callery

Each week, we will look at industry news curated by MediaScope. This week we look at the indefatigable notion of the idea, Apple shooting itself in the foot and the flow of information Facebook steers.

 

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These media plans represent creativity at its finest, regardless of budget – (AdWeek Staff – Adweek)

Media business may be changing on a nearly weekly basis, but one constant that will always matter as long as advertising survives is the Big Idea. This year’s group of winning plans embodies the best of those ideas, and executes across the gamut of media options available to marketers and their media agencies. Some of those ideas even shun the notion of a “campaign,” but all place their client in the best position to succeed. 



Apple’s mistake – The future of wearables is simple – (Tom Goodwin – LinkedIn)

The failure of wearables to ignite the public imagination quite how device makers wanted them to, is in huge part because of how excellent smart phones are. We’ve entered a phase were our phones have become the central way to do everything. At a time when car makers want us to order pizza from our cars or use them as wallets, and fridges become places to make phone calls, maybe we should just accept that phones become the primary screen for virtually everything around us. Maybe it’s time to consider wearables in the context of other devices we own, to focus on optimising for things smartphones can’t do, to design for items that complement each other, I think of this as the idea of personal device ecosystems.

 

The trouble with Facebook’s insular culture (Frederic Filloux – MondayNote)

Facebook’s latest content blunder involves a Norwegian newspaper and an iconic photograph. It is the perfect example of the social network’s inability to deal with its responsibilities as a dominant news distributor. It’s all about the terrible 1967 picture of a naked 9-year-old girl, severely burned, fleeing a napalm bombing in Vietnam. The photographer, Nick Ut, won a Pulitzer Prize. There is no doubt that this image was a factor in ending the Vietnam war. Nor is there any doubt that Facebook’s initial decision to remove the picture illustrates how far the social network is from exhibiting the discernment required to properly handle the immense flow of information it carries.

 

The Bermuda Triangle of advertising (Gord Hotchkiss – MediaPost

Advertising depends on a triangular value exchange: we want entertainment and information, which is delivered via various media. These media need funding – which comes from advertising. Advertising wants exposure to the media audience. So, if we boil that down: we put up with advertising in return for access to entertainment and information. This is the balance that is deemed “OK”. The problem is that this is no longer the world we live in – if we ever did.

 

Five slides to engage clients on a sales call (Doug Weaver – The Drift)

You’ve probably seen first-hand the emotional and human cost of a PowerPoint culture run amok. Your marketing and product people labor over the perfect company narrative, generating dozens of detailed slides containing heavy images and intricate builds and animations. Your sales people feel the pressure to show all these slides to customers who not-so-surreptitiously check their phones and look at their watches. Wasted opportunity follows wasted opportunity. And the worst thing happens: nothing. So here’s the radical idea: run the entire sales call with five simple slides.

 

Denise Shrivell

Founder of MediaScope, Denise is well known and has been actively involved, in the advertising, media and publishing industry in Australia and overseas for 30 years. She started her advertising career as a planner and buyer, then moved to the sales side working with several major publishers. She regularly attends and gets involved with industry conferences & events – and is a judge for the Mumbrella, PANPA & ADMA Awards.

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