Brenton Moore

Study debunks psychic powers, points to neural delusion

You know that strange impulse where you can actually predict what is going to happen? Well, according to science, you’re not psychic, your brain might be broken.

 

 

If you can guess what I’m thinking, then one some level, you’re psychic, right?

Well, no. Don’t be a goose. The long-standing tradition of strange types making sweeping presumptions via the medium of a mystic orb is over – maybe because it’s no longer 1921, or maybe because science doesn’t believe in it, and believes they’ve disproved it.

That’s right. According to the findings of the other university, Yale, the concept of psychic powers is merely a delusion. A nanosecond where the neural highways in your mind momentarily light their streets, so you know the way. Or at least believe you do.

It’s like thinking that you know it is about to rain, and then feeling the first drops…your thought may have been subconsciously influenced by those drops, yet you consciously experience them later.

Subjects with no history of mental illness were asked to predict which of five white squares would turn red and to report results to researchers. As expected, most reported guessing correctly one out of five times – until researchers sped up the test. If a square turned red within approximately 250 milliseconds, subjects were much more likely to say they predicted correctly. In reality, they had simply predicted something that had already happened but had not consciously processed the experience.

So, in English: Flaws in this neural timing mechanism may be the reason some people believe themselves to be mind readers. In the words of lead author, Adam Bear: “It’s like thinking that you know it is about to rain, and then feeling the first drops…your thought may have been subconsciously influenced by those drops, yet you consciously experience them later.”

That being said, for all those psychics reading (and to those who already believe they’ve read this piece), know that there is still a probably lucrative market in Hollywood, as the means to fill rom-com plot holes with the concrete of exposition.

See you in the movies.

 

Brenton Moore

Brenton is somewhat a musician, somewhat a writer and has worked with a number of writers and musicians in Australia, and intends to continue doing so. Even if he has to work retail.

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