Brenton Moore

Which is the favourite child? We’ve measured all the articles on the Internet to find out

Being the most favoured sibling is an odd thing, as we all assume we are it. But, according to the Internet who is the true favourite? Well…

 

 

What a glorious time to be alive. Not only does the apple fall off the tree of knowledge into your lap, that same knowledge can be used to chainsaw the branches off your family tree. For those among us who are fortunate enough to be a sibling, you will know that it represents a civil war that never really pushes for peace. It’s an inter-generation squabble, through both good times and bad, where one must constantly prove that they are the best/favourite/most-favourite achievement of your parent’s evenings with the lights down and the wine waaayyy up.

I’d like to present something to the greater Internet: the sibling echo chamber.  It’s like the Wizard of Oz, where each sibling has an individual, yet equally valuable trait.

To whit: this article. Or there’s this one. Or this?

Sound like you? Of course, it does. Well done, favourite. However, a lazy traipse down the meme street of your preferred e-town will certainly not do. Not if we’re trying to ascertain which sibling is truly the most best one. I propose we do something rash. We work out the value of the sibling (x) compared to the amount of clickbait studies published about the sibling (y), to find out who is the most fucking rad.

First, we step to Google Trends, to find out the lay of the land, and who gets ownership of that search engine; and as the above illustrates, the first-born sibling has clearly called dibs. Although, a point of interest is that the passing fancies of favouritism tend to spike the data, as August 2015 was when the Jan Bradys of the world threw off the yoke of institutionalised bullying to have their day in the sun…before returning to normal service. The same can be said for the eldest (June 2017), and likewise, it seems we’re now entering the age of the youngest. Which, presumably, will be unnecessarily ornate.

However, moving to the meat of this study, with the findings taking the form of a pie: the standard search format we’re using is the phrase “…children are more likely”.

Now, to the results.

Sorry, Jan.

 

Brenton Moore

Brenton is somewhat a musician, somewhat a writer and has worked with a number of writers and musicians in Australia, and intends to continue doing so. Even if he has to work retail.

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