Greg Fallis

Trump’s America: A land of worst fears continually realised

Bitterly, today in Trump’s America seems like a normal one. After yet more hollow Presidential empathy, we’re left to count the cost, and wonder who we’ve become.

 

 

There’s too much to say today, and it feels like there’s not much point in saying any of it. We’re dealing with yet another mass shooting, this time a hate-inspired attack on a synagogue. We’re dealing with this just a day after the arrest of a hate-inspired series of bomb attacks on prominent critics of President Trump – which took place just a couple of days after a hate-inspired double murder of African-Americans in a Kentucky grocery store (after the shooter failed to gain entry into an African-American church).

 

 

In the face of all this hate, President Trump has once again proven himself incapable of performing the basic functions of his office. Instead of trying to unify the nation against this hate, he’s continued to encourage the anger and resentment of his followers. Instead of showing compassion for the victims of this shooting and offering comfort, he blamed the temple for not having an armed guard at the door. Instead of making a sincere call for unity, he continued to fuel the bitterness and the hate. He has falsely indicted Democrats and the news media for a lack of civility while absolutely refusing to acknowledge that his rhetoric plays any part in the problem.

 

 

Many of Trump’s supporters insist that all the hate and violence being inflicted on the public – including this mass murder – is a product of false flag operations conducted by Democrats and the Deep State, intended to hurt Republicans in the midterm elections. Instead of decrying this, Trump has fed into it, insisting that he is a victim of some sort of conspiracy. In doing so, the president has deliberately undermined public trust in many of the fundamental systems of representative democracy – law enforcement, the courts, the news media. And he’s done it purely in the interest of political expediency.

Again, there’s too much to say today. And right now it feels like there’s not much point in saying any of it. But I still think it’s important to say it. And to keep saying it. Over and over and over. Even if it doesn’t seem to do any good, it’s important to keep saying it.

 

 

Greg Fallis

I’ve been around the block a couple of times. I’ve been a medic in the military, a counselor in the Psychiatric/Security unit of a prison for women, and a private investigator specializing in criminal defense. I’ve picked up a few degrees and taught various courses in criminology and sociology at The American University in Washington, D.C. and at Fordham University in New York City. Now I’m primarily a writer and photographer. I’m the managing editor of Utata.org–an international collective of photographers engaged in a variety of ongoing projects. I teach advanced workshops in Mystery Writing for the Gotham Writers’ Workshop. Like I said, I’ve been around the block a couple of times. It’s a good block; I expect I’ll keep going around it for a while.

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