Jason Arment

A tale of two cinemas illuminated in “The Gospel of Eureka”

The ‘Gospel of Eureka’ retells the story of two gay-centric cinemas in the desert of Arizona – located centrally in the feels. 

 

 

When I went to see The Gospel of Eureka, I didn’t know much about the film. From what I’d gathered from the movie trailer and paragraph-long synopsis, I figured The Gospel of Eureka would involve the intersection of faith and gay culture. If that was all the film engaged, it would be more than enough. Life isn’t ever as simple as two things colliding though, which the film reflects.

 

 

Whether or not the Christian faith is becoming more secular or closer to what a God of love intended is beyond the scope of what I feel comfortable addressing with film criticism. Luckily, the movie revolves mostly around theatre, and not just in a meta sense, but literally. It documents two theatres operating in the town of Eureka Springs, Arkansas.

The Gospel of Eureka captures a play of Christ’s death and resurrection put on by a Christian fundamentalists’ institution which operates several facilities on a large lot, one of which is an outdoor amphitheatre. The other theatre is the world of drag, and the film follows a Christian drag show taking place at a gay bar.

I figured The Gospel of Eureka  would involve the intersection of faith and gay culture. If that was all the film engaged, it would be more than enough. Life isn’t ever as simple as two things colliding though, which the film reflects.

The film is a documentary that uses very sparse voice-over to prod the audience’s thoughts in the right direction. The narrator tells of grievous violence towards the LGBTQ community in and around the small town, and even foreshadows the tragic passing of one of the former drag queens the film follows.

It’s not a sad film, nor is it one which tries to be inspirational. All the situations are more than believable, and sometimes even present surprising complexity. Because what the movie is most about is how people are taking Christianity and using it to ask the question, “What is God for me?” The answer to this, according to modern thinking, is that God is love in a way that doesn’t know hate. The fundamentalists are losing their influence and, slowly, secularism is what results from a diffusion of fervent litigiousness. Without a jealous and vengeful God, the followers of Christianity seem to have found some chill—good news for those who want the religion to survive.

Although faith is celebrated in The Gospel of Eureka, it’s never far from death’s somber influence. The children who watch Christ’s crucifixion in the play are struck with the same awe that the old married drag queen couple feel when they look at an old photo album and realise how many friends they’ve lost to AIDS and the faith that steels them against an ominous future reflects not just the grandiosity of the stage, but the hope of its surrounding audience.

 

Jason Arment is the author of Musalaheen, a war memoir published by University of Hell Press.

 

Jason Arment

Jason Arment served in Operation Iraqi Freedom as a Machine Gunner in the USMC. He's earned an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from the Vermont College of Fine Arts. His work has appeared in Narrative Magazine, Lunch Ticket, Chautauqua, Hippocampus, The Burrow Press Review, Dirty Chai, and War, Literature & the Arts: An International Journal of the Humanities; anthologized in Proud to Be: Writing by American Warriors Volume 2 & 4; and is forthcoming in Gulf Coast, The Florida Review, and Phoebe. Jason lives in Denver.

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