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About Claire J. Harris

Claire Harris is a writer in exile who has spent the last decade travelling and working around the world. This is not nearly as glamorous as it sounds and usually involves scraping by on a diet of muesli and cheap wine. Occasionally together. You can find her at www.clairejharris.com

Once upon a time, I was told that boredom is the key to a stress-free life. After much musing, I believe that may be onto something.

 

 

When I was making an independent film, I used to drive from my house to the movie set at around 9 or 10 pm, ready to start an all-night shoot that wouldn’t end until noon the next day. As I passed the rows of houses, mostly dark except for the blue-ish flicker of the TV screen, I wondered what the hell I was doing. Why couldn’t I just come home from work and watch television like everyone else?

Fast forward three years and I still ask myself the same question. My life has not been boring — I spent ten years living out of a backpack and travelling to over 50 countries. Travel was my full-time occupation, occasionally marred by the annoying necessity of actually needing another (paying) job to fund my travels.

A few years ago, I met up with some girls from my high school, some of whom I hadn’t seen for a decade. I was still in the midst of my nomadic lifestyle, which I had some trouble explaining to them. One of them exclaimed: “You must be SO happy!”

I wasn’t. I was always stressed about money (the lack of it), plagued with existential angst, and constantly wondering if I was missing out on hitting the life goals that my non-nomadic peers had already accomplished. I was also consumed by worry that I wasn’t accomplishing anything with my life, even though I only had a vague sense of what those things should be.

But at the time, I didn’t really think that was the point. When I stayed in one place for more than a few months, I could feel boredom setting in — so I packed my bags and left. I definitely wasn’t happy but at least I had stories to tell, I thought.

Now I’m not sure. After I stopped travelling, I quickly found new ways to make myself miserable. The three years I spent making that film were all kinds of hellish — and had a major impact on my mental health. And as soon as it was over, I moved onto my next writing project.

 

I met up with some girls from my high school, some of whom I hadn’t seen for a decade. I was still in the midst of my nomadic lifestyle, which I had some trouble explaining to them. One of them exclaimed: “You must be SO happy!”

 

It’s a good week if several days go by without some sort of rejection email in my inbox. But it’s also a bad one because it usually means I haven’t had the emotional energy to pitch anything for a while, which inevitably leads to all sorts of unbearable guilt.

A terrible day might see multiple rejections come flooding in on a single morning. On weekends, I see people outside my window walking their dogs, having brunch and enjoying beers in the sunshine — and wonder why I’m sitting inside tapping away at a keyboard.

Sometimes I think I could just throw it all in and settle into the same sort of routine that probably makes for a happy life. I have a cushy day job that I have the luxury of doing from home in my pyjamas and which I don’t think about as soon as I’ve stopped doing it. It’s not in any way rewarding but who says it has to be? I’m healthy, financially stable and have everything I need for a happy life. Objectively speaking, I’ve got it made — I don’t say that to brag but only to acknowledge how very, very lucky I am.

I also can’t say for certain that even if I became more successful (and my life became less boring), I would actually be any happier. I remember reading an interview recently with Tom Ford, whose life is anything but boring — he said his son pointed out that every single day he came home from work complaining that he’d had a hard day. In which case, why do it?

So if only I could stop trying to be a writer or a filmmaker. Take my free time back and spend it on doing things that don’t end in rejection emails. Maybe get a dog and walk it on weekends. You know… enjoy the simple things and all that jazz.

But deep down, I know I wouldn’t be able to. I just wish I was wired for boredom.

 

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