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If you’re not sleeping well, be more positive, stupid

According to the University of Illinois, those who are more optimistic, sleep better at night. Great.

 

 

As someone who suffers from depression as well as insomnia, advice rolls in fast, usually wrapped in positivity.

I’m often told to either get more sleep, go for a walk, or think positive. Disappointingly, the latter is now canon, as it seems that those who are inherently optimistic, sleep better.

The University of Illinois rounded up 3,500 people, with the research discovering that there were “significant associations between optimism and various characteristics of self-reported sleep after adjusting for a wide array of variables, including socio-demographic characteristics, health conditions and depressive symptoms.”

The levels of optimism in the subjects were measured via a survey, which asked them how much they agreed with positive statements such as “I’m always optimistic about my future” and with negatively worded sentences such as “I hardly expect things to go my way.”

 

Individuals with greater levels of optimism were more likely to report that they got adequate sleep, slumbering six to nine hours nightly.

 

Participants also reported on their sleep, assessing symptoms of insomnia, difficulty falling asleep and the number of hours of actual sleep they garnered each night.

The co-authors found that “with each standard deviation increase – the typical distance across data points — in participants’ optimism score they had 78% higher odds of reporting very good sleep quality.”

Likewise, individuals with greater levels of optimism were more likely to report that they got adequate sleep, slumbering six to nine hours nightly. And they were 74% more likely to have no symptoms of insomnia and reported less daytime sleepiness.

 

 

 

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