UN demands Australia free Tamil family held on Christmas Island

Today, a court ruled in favour of the Tamil family from Biloela. Sadly, they’ll have to stay under guard on Christmas Island until the matter is settled.

 

 

The plight of the Tamil family from Biloela has reached the attention of the United Nations, as they’ve urged the Australian government to release them from Christmas Island while they continue battling with their own government.

Per SBS, “Carina Ford, a lawyer acting on behalf of the family, received a letter from the UN Human Rights Committee on Wednesday advising them that the committee had approved their request for interim measures and asked the government to release the family within 30 days.”

Reading from the letter sent by the UN, Ford said that “The committee … has requested the State party to transfer within 30 days into a community setting arrangement or to find another way to end their existing situation of detention.”

In late September, Federal Court judge Mordy Bromberg announced the family had a legal case that needed to be decided at trial. He said there was no power to remove one of the family’s daughters, Tharunicaa, from the country under the Migration Act as she had made a valid visa application.

It has the contours of good news, but it speaks as a stay of execution, as the family will not be able to come home to Biloela, and will have to remain on Christmas Island until the court date. Ostensibly, the family is facing months of isolation, with the entirety of the time served under strict watch.

 

PIt has the contours of good news, but it speaks as a stay of execution, as the family will not be able to come home to Biloela, and will have to remain on Christmas Island until the court date.

 

Peter Dutton has insisted that the family is in “community detention” noting that they’re free to head to the local pool or school.

Family friend Angela Fredericks refutes this take, stating that “I’ve been over there myself, had to have permission to go in, I got searched, I wasn’t allowed to take anything in, they are surrounded by guards…we’re very concerned about their wellbeing over there, so we’re very much are calling for them to be placed, if not in (the) community, back in detention in Australia where we know they can have visitors, they’ve got access to the internet and we can ensure they are connected to the community,” Ms Fredericks told SBS News.

 

 

 

 

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