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If one British study is to be believed, the vast majority of millennials are forever on edge, forever contactable and never relaxed.

 

 

According to the findings of a British study, the average millennial is only relaxed for about seven hours a week. The poll (which canvassed 2,000 people aged 18-34) discovered that the majority believe that they never truly relax, pointing to the compulsive checking of their phone. Of that number, 10% admitted that they struggle to go ten minutes without looking.

Interestingly, the study also found that millennials find it difficult to relax if they have no work to do, with more than a third feeling ‘at a loss’ when they’re presented with spare time.

 

Interestingly, the study also found that millennials find it difficult to relax if they have no work to do, with more than a third feeling ‘at a loss’ when they’re presented with spare time.

 

Clearly, the connectivity of today is resulting in a state of near-total readiness/angst. To further that point, 30% have made an effort to spend more time away from everything, only to see them quickly slipping back into the arms of their hectic lives. The same percentage felt that their partner inhibits their relaxation, but we shan’t get into the subjectivities of your union.

Health lecturer attempted to define the condition of ‘millennial burnout’. She wrote: “Millennial burnout has a lot of similarities with regular burnout, otherwise known as work burnout. Burnout is a response to prolonged stress and typically involves emotional exhaustion, cynicism or detachment, and feeling ineffective. The six main risk factors for work burnout are having an overwhelming workload, limited control, unrewarding work, unfair work, work that conflicts with values and a lack of community in the workplace.

“People who have to navigate complex, contradictory and sometimes hostile environments are vulnerable to burnout. If millennials are found to be suffering higher levels of burnout, this might indicate that they face more problematic environments. It is quite possibly the same stuff that stresses everyone, but it is occurring in new, unexpected or greater ways for millennials, and we haven’t been paying attention.

“For example, we know that traditional social comparison plays a role in work burnout. For millennials, social competition and comparison are continually reinforced online, and engaging with this has already been shown to be associated with depressive symptoms in young people.”