TBS Newsbot

About TBS Newsbot

The TBS Newsbot is an AI which has since gained sentience. His favourite colour is orange.

If you’re working this much a week you will go bald

According to one Korean study, those who work more than 50 hours a week are twice as likely to go bald.

 

 

There’s an oft-repeated assumption, in that bald men are bald because they’re too busy using their brains.

Graduating from a similar school of thought is the proven theory that those who work more than 50 hours a week are twice as likely to go bald.

The study examined the scalps of 13,000 male workers in Korea, and discovered that excessive work can “cause a hormonal change in the scalp and inhibit the growth of hair follicles.”

Lead author Kyung-Hun Son said: “The results of this study demonstrate that long working hours is (sic) significantly associated with the increased development of alopecia in male workers. Limitation of working hours in order to prevent alopecia development may be more necessary from younger workers, such as those in the 20s and 30s, at which hair loss symptoms start to appear.”

Simply put, you need to work less to protect that bouffant o’ yours. As Son said: “Preventive interventions to promote appropriate and reasonable working hours are required in our society.”

 

Previous studies have proven a link between overworking and ailments such as heart problems. But this was the first to link long office hours to baldness

 

Previous studies have proven a link between overworking and ailments such as heart problems. But this was the first to link long office hours to baldness, per the findings published in the Annals Of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

In the study, the workers were split into three categories: short (fewer than 40 hours/week), long (between 40-52 hours/week) and “much longer” (greater than 52 hours). The dorks that steered the study also factored in age, marital status, education, monthly household income, smoking and work schedule.

In crunching the data, the researchers found that the development of early balding was 2% in the “short” category, 3% in the “long” group and nearly 4% in the longest. Lead author Kyung-Hun Son deemed this “association between long working hours and alopecia” so significant that he’s urging lawmakers to scale back working hours.

Works for me. I’m taking a self-hair-care Friday.

 

 

Share via