Japan thinks we should DIY our final resting place

Authored in Japan, the DIY coffin kit that has become a huge hit, promising to help families save costs and giving loved ones one last aborted weekend project to argue over. 

 

 

Do-it-yourself projects are typically associated with the words fulfilling, fun and cost-effective. A company in Japan can guarantee that the morbid event of a death can at least be the latter, bringing a DIY coffin kit to the market that promises to help families save costs.

Developed by Tsubasa Public Utility Co., the kit contains all that necessities for going 6 feet under at a little under 350 Australian dollars (bar shipping costs).

Ground rental and burial costs are not included, but the fact that a company has sought innovation around such a morbid event speaks volumes on the costs associated with funerals in Japan. 

“Funerals are very expensive and are a big burden in Japan,” says Shinohara Norifumi, the CEO of Tsubasa Public Utility Co. “The average funeral cost in Japan is about 1.5 million yen (20,358.29 AUD) recently, and if you use such DIY set, it can be done for less than 30,000 yen (400 AUD).” 

 

Ground rental and burial costs are not included, but the fact that a company has sought innovation around such a morbid event speaks volumes on the costs associated with funerals in Japan. 

 

The DIY Funeral Set is comprised of a wooden coffin (with a fold-open window to show the face of the deceased), a pillow, a mattress, a blanket and Furoshiki (wrapping cloths). The set also comes with an urn (that, unfortunately, looks a lot like a biscuit tin) and box to hold the bones after the cremation. Accompanying all this is a handbook to walk you through how to perform ceremonial rites to put the soul of the departed at ease and information to aid the process of getting the body ready for departure.

“This manual contains information on how to carry the body, how to lay it down, and when actually cremating, how to make an appointment, how to pay, how to do it at the crematory, those things are explained,” says Norifumi.

With all this, you would be forgiven for thinking you’re all set for a decent home-job burial or cremation. However, Tsubasa have made it quite clear that you should definitely not attempt home burials or cremations, and that you’ll need a mortician handy for the embalming, and someone with experience in cosmetic preparation (unless you really want to up the DIY aspect). 

You may as well make your last purchase a financially responsible one.

 

 

 

 

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