Men less likely to wear protective masks, study finds

According to a survey of almost 3,000 Americans, men are far less likely to wear protective masks, believing them to be a sign of weakness. OK.

 

 

According to researchers from Middlesex University, men are less likely to wear face masks during the coronavirus, as they’re “a sign of weakness”.

Now, while we can file this under yeah, duh, Dr Valerio Capraro, author of the study, said: “Our results also revealed that men are more likely to express negative emotions and stigma when wearing a face-covering mask.”

In the study, the researchers surveyed 2,459 people living in the US (numbering 1,266 men, 1,183 women, and ten did not disclose their gender).

Participants were asked about their intentions to wear a face mask outside the home, as well as how they would feel whilst wearing a mask.

While the female respondents were more likely to wear a mask outside, the men viewed the masks as  “shameful, uncool, and a sign of weakness.”

Dr Capraro said: “Our results found that men have less intentions to wear a face-covering than women particularly in counties where face covering is not mandatory.

 

While the female respondents were more likely to wear a mask outside, the men viewed the masks as shameful, uncool, and a sign of weakness.

 

“We discovered the gender differences with regards to their intentions to wear a face-covering are impacted by the person’s likelihood to contract the virus and recover.

“In other words, the fact that men are less inclined to wear a face-covering can be partly explained by the fact that men are more likely to believe that they will be relatively unaffected by the disease compared to women.

“This is particularly ironic because official statistics show that actually coronavirus impacts men more seriously than women.

“Our results also revealed that men are more likely to express negative emotions and stigma when wearing a face-covering mask.”

 

 

Share via