Jordan King Lacroix

About Jordan King Lacroix

Jordan King-Lacroix was born in Montreal, Canada but moved to Sydney, Australia when he was 8 years old. He has achieved a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Sydney and McGill University, Canada, as well as a Masters of Creative Writing from the University of Sydney.

The joke’s on us: Our blackface culture is deeper than Chris Lilley

So, we’ve finally caught up with Chris Lilley. But the decade in between has offered many examples of blackface. What’s your problem, Australia?

 

 

Okay. I’m going to say two trigger words and, no matter who you are, you are likely to have a visceral reaction of either condemnation or defence: Chris Lilley.

Yes, that strange Australian cultural icon who somehow got away with performing a racist song, while dressed racistly, and, for good measure, putting on a racist accent at the 2006 Logies has witnessed his deletion from streaming platform Netflix. He also faced heavy criticism in 2017 after he shared a remix of a song from his 2011 show Angry Boys (sung as one of the show’s characters, S. Mouse, portrayed by Lilley in blackface), one that depicted an Aboriginal boy being run over and killed. Content aside, the timing was also an issue, as Lilley posted the video a week after the court case presiding over the death Elijah Doughty, an indigenous teen who was ran over and killed by a white driver.

 

 

Lilley has managed to make a career out of race-facing. I say that because I don’t know if it’s called ‘blackface’ when you dress up as a Chinese-Australian as well. Let me just say that again: a white man – in the 2000s, in Australia – made a career for himself playing characters that were, for the most part, a) children and b) people of colour.

I have no idea how he got away with it for so long. As a filthy immigrant (hailing for the tumultuous lands of French Canada) Australian comedy was very odd to me when I moved here. First and foremost, it was very British – lots of costumes and props – but there was the added casual racism element. Maybe I’m more sensitive to it, coming from North America where blackface is very much not okay, so it seemed very odd that a grown man was playing a Tongan teenager.

Chris Lilley was nothing more than a guy who was constantly given a platform because we thought his accents were funny. If he really cared about the characters – or, more importantly, the people from the group he was ‘representing’ – then he would have hired appropriate actors for them.

I don’t need a middle-aged white man “embodying” the role of a Tongan teen, or a Chinese-Australian student. The Chris Lilley world – where every human being seems to have the face of Chris Lilley – is terrifying to me, and I don’t want to live in it.

 

Reverse-blackface isn’t a thing. There’s no historically significant use of it to keep an entire group of people down. True, the intention behind it can be potentially offensive, or even bigoted in its own right, but the equation between it and blackface is simply unbalanced.

 

There are other recent examples of a white man donning blackface for lols, such as Robert Downey Jr in Tropic Thunder. Well, let me talk to you about a thing called ‘intention’. In the film, RDJ plays an Australian, playing an American, playing a black man. One of the other characters is an actual black person who is constantly making fun of, or being annoyed at, RDJ’s character.

Because RDJ’s character represents the inherent racism of Hollywood, vis-à-vis getting a white actor to play a black character it’s a satire of racism, not a satire of race.

Jamie Foxx discussed this, and a recent project in which he, a black man, dresses up as a “white, racist cop” and RDJ plays a “Mexican guy”.

Now, I don’t know how this film will turn out. But, let me pre-empt some bullshit by saying black people dressing up as white people for movies isn’t ‘reverse-blackface’. That isn’t a thing. There’s no historically significant use of it to keep an entire group of people down. True, the intention behind it can be potentially offensive, or even bigoted in its own right, but the equation between it and blackface is simply unbalanced.

When Chris Lilley dons Jonah’s make-up, what is he saying other than, “I can do a funny accent, and can, therefore, play a black kid”? Nothing. Just like those schmucks who dressed up like Aboriginal people for a party, or that Australian girl’s “African-themed” 21st birthday party, or when that mum put her kid in blackface to dress him up as his favourite footy player. It doesn’t say anything other than “other races are a costume to me”.

Yeah, nah, Australia.

 

 

 

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