Ellenor Cox

About Ellenor Cox

Ellenor was relieved to discover the term ‘quarter-life crisis’ which explained her leaving her high flying career as a QANTAS executive to go backpacking around the world to ‘find herself’. Her epiphany resulted in a 20+ career as a film producer which saw her collect a swag of awards including an Emmy and an AACTA. Right on cue, her mid-life crisis arrived and she’s now retrained as an executive coach and consultant. Her fascination with how people tick, a love of sailing and spending as much time as possible at the beach have remained her faithful constants in life!

Let’s not do our isolation ‘to-do’ lists

As we’re facing another round of isolation, we may again feel the pressure to maximise our time with grand plans and completed projects. But, there’s another way.

 

 

‘Isolation. Great! This is the perfect time for me to archive all my photos, declutter the attic, learn Tai-Chi, et cetera’. Everywhere we look, we’re being told to use this ‘opportunity’ for self-improvement or the time to complete a long-suspended project.

How many of you have made similar lists? And how many of you still have the same list, months later? The activities are still there, and we’re feeling just as busy as we were before, right?  

Forget the list. Right now, we need to be very conscious of our emotions  If you’re already feeling overwhelmed and anxious, layering shame on top of that because we feel like we should be ‘doing’ isolation better, then we’re just compounding and multiplying the suffering. 

As a species, we’re hardwired for connection, and right now this basic need has been taken away from us. More so, the majority of us are pretty terrified with the existential crisis of being alone. That’s why we’re all rushing to fill the void with constant Zoom meetings, online parties and ‘walking dates’. 

There’s been no time to sculpt our best body or write our first novel, as we’ve been busy meeting our needs for interaction. Which isn’t a bad thing.

 

As we approach another round of confinement, I suggest we hit the reset button. Let’s readjust on our expectations around what we will and can achieve. Let’s not have huge expectations, and feel the need to change your life in this brief pause we’ve been given.

 

As we approach another round of confinement, I suggest we hit the reset button. Let’s readjust on our expectations around what we will and can achieve. Let’s not have huge expectations, and feel the need to change your life in this brief pause we’ve been given.

Let’s reduce the stakes and simply become curious. Curiosity may allow us to relinquish your confinement expectations, and just become comfortable with your own company, your own interests, and with the space of not having everything structured.

So, let’s take a collective deep breath. See where our curiosity takes us, rather than being shepherded by the ‘To-Do Lists’ plastered on our fridge.

 

 

 

 

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