Donald Trump is set to be impeached for a second time, with the Senate poised to meet next week to decide his fate.

 

 

 This morning the United States House of Representatives voted in favour of impeachment by a measure of 232-197, confirming that Donald Trump will be the only American president to be impeached twice.

Interestingly, it was also the most bipartisan impeachment vote in history, with ten Republicans supporting the measure.

While impeachment is a political process, and not a criminal one, it is now up to the Senate to decide whether they will convict Donald Trump. If that vote passes (which will need two-thirds support), other than booting him out of the White House, he will be banned from ever taking office again, and his political pension will be disqualified.

The Senate’s leading Democrat, Chuck Schumer responds to the Trump impeachment: “A Senate trial can begin immediately, with agreement from the current Senate Majority Leader to reconvene the Senate for an emergency session, or it will begin after January 19th. But make no mistake, there will be an impeachment trial in the United States Senate.”

“Despite the efforts of Donald Trump and violent insurrectionists, America is not a dictatorship,” Schumer said.” We have been and will forever remain a Democracy that respects and reveres the rule of law, including the bedrock principle that the voters choose our leaders – that just power can only derive from the consent of the governed.”

Nancy Pelosi delivered an impassioned speech calling on members to support impeachment. “He must go,” the Democratic speaker said of the president. “He is a clear and present danger to the nation we all love.”

 

A Senate trial can begin immediately, with agreement from the current Senate Majority Leader to reconvene the Senate for an emergency session, or it will begin after January 19th. But make no mistake, there will be an impeachment trial in the United States Senate.

 

In 2019, the first impeachment drive was inspired by the revelations that Donald Trump attempted to get the Ukrainian government to investigate Hunter Biden, who purportedly has business interests within the country. It became an issue of quid pro quo.

In regular English, Donald told the Ukrainians to investigate the son of Joe Biden, or risk losing military funding from the Trump administration.

According to America’s ambassador to the EU, Gordon Sondland, it was Rudy Giuliani who was pushing for the deal at the behest of Donald Trump.

“We did not want to work with Giuliani” the ambassador testified, but noted that all Ukraine issues were redirected to Trump’s personal lawyer with the command “talk with Rudy”. Sondland said he was following Presidential orders from that point forward.

Sondland said that he raised the issue to VP Mike Pence, in that he was concerned that the military aid was “being tied” to the Biden investigation. “Everyone was in the loop…it was an open secret,” Sondland said.

Per NBC News in September 2019, “Trump admitted he discussed Biden, a possible 2020 challenger, with Zelensky. On Tuesday, he said he would release the transcript of the call and confirmed reports that his administration temporarily froze almost $400 million in aid to Ukraine. But he gave a new reason for doing so: He said he wanted European countries to contribute money, too, and did not want the United States to do so alone.”

While Donald Trump was impeached, the Republican-held Congress did not push through with criminal charges. That may change today.

 

 

 

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