After a YouTuber was charged $69,000 for an X-ray, he decided to create his own machine And he did. But don’t you do it.

 

 

There’s a rich history of privatised American medicine working as a tonic for sad citizens of elsewhere. For instance, do you remember the time a man tried to take a selfie with a rattlesnake, got bit, and was later charged $200,000 by the hospital that he managed to drag himself to?  Ha ha. However, the idiocy of privatised medicine has struck again, after a man decided to build his own X-ray machine, a hospital bill charged him $69,210 ($93,485 AUD). Gallingly, William Osman was happy to receive a steep discount, only paying $2,500 due to his “great insurance”, but he took the internet to solve a question that Americans are potentially asking themselves: Can I make my own X-ray machine for less than what my hospital bills would be?

As he explains: “My will to do science is significantly stronger than my will to live…this is my magnum opus. This is the most dangerous contraption I have ever built.”

On Osman’s shopping list was a $155 X-ray vacuum tube he recovered from a broken dental X-ray machine he bought on eBay, a giant roll of sheet lead, several Geiger counters and an electricity supply capable of delivering 60,000 volts. You what, mate?

Spoiler alert, he was able to produce a passable image of his finger, but why, America, why. You created Jazz. And baseball. And Donald Trump. You know what? Go for your life.

 

 

Bitterly, as day follows night, a reaction video followed Osman’s opus, as interventional radiologist Dr Michael Cellini said that the device was “actually pretty good,” before noting that hospitals have better standard X-ray machines. Duh. Nevertheless, Cellini was “pretty impressed”.

As IflScience put it, “the radiologist (and other radiologists online) were less impressed when he chose to X-ray his own hand. Osman points out that the radiation that he’ll receive from his X-ray is not as bad as a CT scan, or from a year of living your life being bombarded by background levels of radiation.”

“The X-rays produced are not as bad as a CT scan – but that doesn’t mean you should do it,” Dr Cellini confirmed. “It is probably less than what you’d get from an annual background radiation dose. There is risk, but not as high as you’d think.”

The video received less of an enthusiastic reaction from experts commenting on his video, where one wrote “s a radiation safety officer at a materials lab, 80% of this video had me screaming internally”, nor on the Radiology subreddit where a popular comment read “very radiologist watching this is rolling their eyes so far back they can see their optic nerve.”

I mean, the man is a YouTuber. You could make the case that the industry-standard extreme positivity, over the top reactions and talking to yourself is equally as damaging as radiation, but the video proves that it’s possible to create your own X-ray machine in your house. But please just don’t do it. Just implement universal health care, idiots.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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